Meet the Committee

Chair Marj Powner
Treasurer Barbara Blaber
Secretary Karen Worsley
Community Engagement Valerie Hughes
Researcher/Historian Charlotte Starkey
SME – Horse Riders  Mary Lennon

Chair Marj Powner

undefined I am passionate about the local community and was instrumental in establishing the Friends of Dainewell Park and the Friends of Coppice Library.  I have also been supporting a Public Rights of Way campaign relating to Carrington Moss.

I am concerned about the lack of genuine consultation around the future of Carrington Moss and I am delighted to serve as Chair for the Committee.

I look forward to working with the Committee and other residents to develop our plans to increase community involvement and promote the protection and enhancement of the ecological value of Carrington Moss.

Although I still work full time, I manage to find space in my calendar for community projects such as this.  I do like to be organised though, so I can fit everything in.

My long-suffering partner and I have three lovely grandchildren and our dog, Lexy, to keep us busy.  I enjoy family history research when I do get a bit of spare time.

Treasurer Barbara Blaber

undefined Born in Sale, I lived with my parents in the Manor Avenue area until 1976.   Some of my earliest memories are of my Dad and I walking our dogs on Carrington Moss.  After more than 30 years living in other parts of Greater Manchester, Staffordshire, Leeds and the East Midlands, I finally came home in 2010.

I am a Chartered Accountant and have worked for several large organisations, most recently in the brewing industry, as an accountant and a project manager.  Following early retirement 8 years ago, I have worked on the 2011 census, fed and watered the feral cats at the animal sanctuary, and have been a Slimming World consultant!!

I now describe myself as a charity financial administrator.  I carry out a variety of work, including basic book keeping, accounts preparation and audits, grant applications and process reviews, for several small charities, and am treasurer of 3 local community groups, notably Friends of Dainewell Park with which I have been involved since its start. 

I am married to Steve, a truck driver, and we have two dogs, a loopy black Labrador and a very vocal border terrier, and a rescue cat fondly referred to as Pyscho Sophie.  We are both keen football supporters (sadly not of the same team!) and motor sport enthusiasts.

Secretary Karen Worsley

undefined Growing up, horses were a massive part of my life for 30 years.  During which time Carrington Moss played a huge role as a safe place to ride.  Riding on the roads was not a desirable option for me, even though the roads were much quieter, it didn’t stop a drunken idiot driving into the back of my horse as I rode along Carrington Lane.  I was knocked unconscious and my horse made a mess of the car as he propelled himself forward of the car bonnet.  Luckily my horse only had a few scratches,  I came round with the car tyre touching my nose, my face all bloody and grazed of the tarmac.  If that had happened today with the increased traffic on the roads I dread to think what the outcome would have been.

This is why the Moss is so important to all the equestrian establishments that surround Carrington Moss.  It’s a safe and pleasant environment to enjoy the pleasures of horse riding.

The past 20 years have been taken up walking my dogs, I walk part of the Moss everyday, rain or shine.  More recently I have developed an interest in photography and the various flora and fauna the Moss has to offer.  The more I stop and look, the more I realise what a special place Carrington Moss really is.    It is an area of beauty that deserves to be preserved the best way we can. This is why I am part of the group fighting to preserve and enhance Carrington Moss for future generations

Community Engagement Valerie Hughes

undefinedAs an extensive user of Carrington Moss for over 40 years, I am passionate about the future of this wonderful green space which offers solace to those in need of peace and tranquility.  It reduces stress and anxiety, lifts the mood and makes everyone feel much better.

I meet lots of people when I am out on the Moss, walkers, cyclists, horse-riders, bird-watchers, nature enthusiasts and professionals from a number of local and national organisations.  I am looking forward to linking with those organisations as we develop our plans to protect and enhance Carrington Moss for future generations.

I live and work in Sale and spend my leisure time feeding the birds on Carrington Moss and looking after the welfare of the many animals I come across on my travels.

Researcher Charlotte Starkey

I have played , explored, walked and cycled over Carrington Moss for over 65 years and continue to be astonished at the richness of this greenspace.  Still discovering more through extensive research into the Medieval Caryngton family, especially during the Hundred Years’ War under the Black Prince and Edward III.  An account of the Medieval Caryngton Men-at-Arms reveals just how rich the history of this region has been since Norman times. It is part of a lush, rich landscape that stretches through Warburton to Lymm and the Cheshire Plain.

I am involved with a number of ecological and animal welfare groups and bring to the Moss poetry and drama where narratives of the natural world celebrate our closeness to it (Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Blake, Wordsworth, Hopkins, Ted Hughes, Simon Armitage); and archived medieval records involving the Caryngtons and neighbouring lords of the manors take us deep into the history of the region.  My German Shepherds and innumerable cats have been my great companions, sometimes in conflict with each other, and with me, just like those warriors of old.

Now retired full-time from a university college and local universities, I have the time to write, research and explore the Moss: the swifts, house martins and swallows as their young fledge in preparation for their epic migration towards Africa. Every year they return as they have for centuries; the buzzards, rooks and ravens, magpies, lapwings, and those voles of old that suddenly reappear: they would make Sinderland Brook bubble as if the water was on the boil; and they still appear.

I am profoundly concerned that this peat bog, much abused by profiteers since 1886, is protected from their modern versions, especially since its carbon capture is at the centre of concerns for the climate of our planet. Not for nothing was the Moss left alone for over 6,000 years by human inhabitants of this region, and long before then, too. We mess with nature at our peril.

Subject Matter Expert – Horse Riding  Mary Lennon

undefinedI am a Trafford resident and have ridden regularly on Carrington Moss since getting my own horse in 2003.

I have a keen interest in maintaining and improving access for all and I volunteer with Trafford Ramblers on the fortnightly clearing of overgrown Public Rights of Way. 

I have been the Treasurer on The British Horse Society – Greater Manchester Committee since 2006. I’m too old to be jumping fences so I’m now a happy hacker with the occasional 32km pleasure ride.




We look forward to working with you to preserve and enhance this wonderful green space for future generations of Carrington Moss users